New Zealand PM: talks needed before US rejoins Pacific pact

German Chancellor Angela Merkel welcomes New Zealand's Prime Minister Jacinta Ardern prior to a meeting in the chancellery in Berlin Tuesday, April 17, 2018. (Wolfgang Kumm/dpa via AP)
German Chancellor Angela Merkel welcomes New Zealand's Prime Minister Jacinta Ardern prior to a meeting in the chancellery in Berlin Tuesday, April 17, 2018. (Wolfgang Kumm/dpa via AP)
German Chancellor Angela Merkel, center, welcomes the Prime Minister of New Zealand Jacinda Ardern, left, for a meeting at the chancellery in Berlin, Germany, Tuesday, April 17, 2018. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
German Chancellor Angela Merkel, right, welcomes the Prime Minister of New Zealand Jacinda Ardern, left, for a meeting at the chancellery in Berlin, Germany, Tuesday, April 17, 2018. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)

BERLIN — New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern says she can envision the United States re-joining the Trans Pacific Partnership trade deal but not without renegotiation.

After meeting Tuesday with German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Ardern said several countries have indicated they might want to sign on to the deal, known as TPP, which was signed by her nation and 10 others last month.

U.S. President Donald Trump pulled the U.S. out of TPP negotiations but last week signaled he might reopen talks.

Ardern says if the United States would like to follow through on their interest, that would trigger a renegotiation as it would if others were interested in joining the agreement.

She says it's "not simply a matter of putting their hand up and slotting straight back into the agreement."

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